Category: Asia and the Pacific

Identification of Smoldering Peatland Fires in Indonesia via Triple-Phase Temperature Analysis of VIIRS Nighttime Data 7/28/2021

Identification of Smoldering Peatland Fires in Indonesia via Triple-Phase Temperature Analysis of VIIRS Nighttime Data

The Payne Institute Earth Observation Group researchers Christopher D. Elvidge, Mikhail Zhizhin, Feng-Chi Hsu, and NOAA researcher Kimberly Baugh have contributed to the book titled Biomass Burning in South and Southeast Asia.  They apply a spectral un-mixing procedure to uniquely identify low-temperature (320–500 K) peatland smoldering in Indonesia using nighttime data collected by the Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS). The analysis begins with the detection of subpixel infrared (IR) emitters in six spectral bands spanning the near-infrared (NIR), shortwave infrared (SWIR), and midwave infrared (MWIR). With sunlight eliminated, the NIR and SWIR radiances can be fully attributed to the IR emitter. July 28, 2021.  

Olympics medals made of mashed up smartphones 7/27/2021

Olympics medals made of mashed up smartphones

Payne Institute Director Morgan Bazilian contributed to this article about recycled goods being used at the 2020 Olympics.  The Olympic torch, a sacred flame that dates back to ancient Greece, has now become an icon of the future, made up of aluminum waste from temporary housing built after the 2011 Tōhoku earthquake and tsunami. Meanwhile, 79,000 tons of metal salvaged from donated smartphones and electronics are now the key ingredients in 5,000 Olympic and Paralympic medals, according to the International Olympic Committee.  July 27, 2021. 

VIIRS Boat Detection Data (VBD) 6/8/2021

VIIRS Boat Detection Data (VBD)

Payne Institute Earth Observation Group Director Christopher Elvidge and his researchers produce global fishing boat detection data in near-real time from low light imaging data collected by the NASA / NOAA Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS). The detections are produced with a nominal four-hour temporal latency – with files typically ready by 06:00 local time. Most of the detections come from vessels deploying heavy lighting to attract catch. This is a common practice in Asia and several other areas. EOG send email alerts on vessel detections in marine protected areas to government agencies and NGO’s in Indonesia, Philippines and Thailand.  June 8, 2021. 

GOVERNMENT AGENCY PERSPECTIVE – THE LATROBE VALLEY AUTHORITY IN VICTORIA, AUSTRALIA: Scope, Authority, Organization and Key Operating Principles part 1 5/28/2021

GOVERNMENT AGENCY PERSPECTIVE, PART 1 – THE LATROBE VALLEY AUTHORITY IN VICTORIA, AUSTRALIA: Scope, Authority, Organization and Key Operating Principles

Payne Institute Fellow Brad Handler on the Just Transitions Podcast discussing the scope, authority, organization, and key operating principles of the Latrobe Valley Authority (LVA) with Karen Cain, Chief Executive Officer at LVA, Victoria, Australia.  May 28, 2021.
Just Transitions – Economic Development Organization Perspective

The Latrobe Valley Authority in Victoria, Australia: Growing Employment Demand/Supply and Smart Specialization (part 2) 5/28/2021

Government Agency Perspective, Part 2 – The Latrobe Valley Authority in Victoria, Australia: Growing Employment Demand/Supply and Smart Specialization

Payne Institute Fellow Brad Handler on the Just Transitions Podcast discussing the key services of the Latrobe Valley Authority (LVA) and growing growing employment demand/supply and smart specialization opportunities in the region with Karen Cain, Chief Executive Officer at LVA, Victoria, Australia.  May 28, 2021.
Just Transitions – Economic Development Organization Perspective

Fukushima: ten years on from the disaster, was Japan’s response right? 3/10/2021

Fukushima: ten years on from the disaster, was Japan’s response right?

Payne Institute Fellow William Nuttall and Philip Thomas write about how the world saw something never before caught on camera on March 12, 2011: an explosion ripping the roof off a nuclear power plant – Japan’s Fukushima Daiichi. The blast wasn’t actually nuclear, it was the result of hot hydrogen gas encountering the cool, outside air during the aftermath of the Tōhoku earthquake and tsunami. But the distinction hardly mattered – something had clearly gone terribly wrong.  In order to minimise suffering in future nuclear accidents, there are important lessons from March 2011 that must be learned.  March 10, 2021.

Indicators of Electric Power Instability from Satellite Observed Nighttime Lights 9/30/2020

Indicators of Electric Power Instability from Satellite Observed Nighttime Lights

Payne Institute Earth Observation Group writes about how electric power services are fundamental to prosperity and economic development. Disruptions in the electricity power service can range from minutes to days. Such events are common in many developing economies, where the power generation and delivery infrastructure is often insufficient to meet demand and operational challenges. Yet, despite the large impacts, poor data availability has meant that relatively little is known about the spatial and temporal patterns of electric power reliability. Here, we explore the expressions of electric power instability recorded in temporal profiles of satellite observed surface lighting collected by the Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) low light imaging day/night band (DNB). September 30, 2020.  

Country Spotlight: Gas Flaring in India 9/3/2020

Country Spotlight: Gas Flaring in India

The Payne Institute looks at the gas flaring in India.  According to the IEA, India is the fourth largest refiner of oil (behind the US, Russia, and China), and the third largest importer of crude oil and LNG (behind China and the US), though is outranked by 24 other countries on oil production, with declining trends.  September 3, 2020. 

Measuring “Reasonably Reliable” access to electricity services 8/19/2020

Measuring “Reasonably Reliable” access to electricity services

Payne Fellow Todd Moss, Morgan Bazilian, John Ayaburi, and Jacob Kincer write that while the electricity access rate is regularly measured in most countries, there are no routinely tracked metrics that measure reliability. This paper presents a new approach that: (1) aggregates all available country data on reliability; (2) defines a minimum threshold metric for ‘reasonable reliability’; and (3) estimates the number of people without ‘reasonably reliable’ electricity services. We estimate the number of people without access to reliable electricity is approximately 3.5 billion. This new metric provides a more granular view of the enormous energy access gap globally, and insights for future investment and policy decisions.  August 19, 2020.